handouts for higher education students

To support teachers’ efforts to teach content and develop essential learning skills, we’re offering a collection of handouts that teachers can share with students. They cover topics related to learning, not course content. For example, one highlights study strategies that research shows improves grades. Another addresses the free-rider problem in groups, advising students how they can respond to students not doing their fair share. You can distribute these handouts in class or post them online without discussing them.

We’re well aware that many students avoid reading material not destined to appear on exams. We’ve tried to work around that aversion to extra reading with topics that address issues of concern and interest to students. Although the handouts can be used alone, you can reinforce their relevance and importance with an endorsement or a mention of something you consider good advice. If a handout helps only a few students, it’s still worth sharing—at least that’s what we think.

You don’t need our permission to use these handouts unless you’re going to publish them. We don’t mind if you opt to make some edits or change the format. We’ve made that easy by formatting the handouts as downloadable and editable Word documents.

By the way, if you’ve developed a handout that offers advice or help with some learning-related issues, and you wish to share it, please send it to us at editor@magnapubs.com. Good teaching materials take time and energy to develop. They can affect student learning in courses other than your own.

—Maryellen Weimer

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handouts for higher education students

To support teachers’ efforts to teach content and develop essential learning skills, we’re offering a collection of handouts that teachers can share with students. They cover topics related to learning, not course content. For example, one highlights study strategies that research shows improves grades. Another addresses the free-rider problem in groups, advising students how they can respond to students not doing their fair share. You can distribute these handouts in class or post them online without discussing them.

We’re well aware that many students avoid reading material not destined to appear on exams. We’ve tried to work around that aversion to extra reading with topics that address issues of concern and interest to students. Although the handouts can be used alone, you can reinforce their relevance and importance with an endorsement or a mention of something you consider good advice. If a handout helps only a few students, it’s still worth sharing—at least that’s what we think.

You don’t need our permission to use these handouts unless you’re going to publish them. We don’t mind if you opt to make some edits or change the format. We’ve made that easy by formatting the handouts as downloadable and editable Word documents.

By the way, if you’ve developed a handout that offers advice or help with some learning-related issues, and you wish to share it, please send it to us at editor@magnapubs.com. Good teaching materials take time and energy to develop. They can affect student learning in courses other than your own.

—Maryellen Weimer