A Targeted Approach to Making Changes to Our Teaching

making teaching changes
A previous column on how hard it is to sustain instructional change has got me thinking more about the change process. For years I’ve suggested that our efforts to change need to be more targeted. So often we change by doing some of this, a bit of that, a little something else, and hopping back to what we implemented initially to fuss with it more. It’s not systematic, purposeful, or focused change.

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[dropcap]A[/dropcap]previous column on how hard it is to sustain instructional change has got me thinking more about the change process. For years I’ve suggested that our efforts to change need to be more targeted. So often we change by doing some of this, a bit of that, a little something else, and hopping back to what we implemented initially to fuss with it more. It’s not systematic, purposeful, or focused change.  For Those Who TeachI’d like to be able to cite some research that supports my claim that targeted change is better, but we really haven’t studied the process of implementing instructional changes very much, or have we studied it at all? Nonetheless, there are many reasons why a targeted approach to improving teaching and learning is the more viable option. The targeted approach doesn’t rule out dealing with problems that may emerge in a course or the occasional addition of a new idea that’s too good to ignore, but the overall approach to growth and development as a teacher targets one area of instruction at a time and works through it in a focused way. Is this a better way? What do you think? I welcome your comments.