A Memo to Students about Unexpected Grades

Credit: iStock.com/AntonioGuillem
Credit: iStock.com/AntonioGuillem
It doesn’t make any sense. You worked hard on that assignment, studied long hours for the test. You’re upset—texting complaints and spouting off to friends. Why not talk to me? Let me start with some reasons why you should.

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To: My Students
From: Your Professor
Subject: That Grade That Wasn’t What You Expected

It doesn’t make any sense. You worked hard on that assignment, studied long hours for the test. You’re upset—texting complaints and spouting off to friends. Why not talk to me? Let me start with some reasons why you should.           

Now let me give you some hints on handling the conversation.

As long as I’m giving advice, there are few things I’d rather not hear when you ask to have your grade changed.

Please come and see me. It’s a conversation I’m happy to have with you.


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