Course Netiquette Expectations

writing on sticky note
All students pay tuition and deserve a positive and courteous learning environment. Students should be aware that their behavior impacts other people, even when interacting online. I hope that we will all strive to develop a positive and supportive environment and will be courteous to fellow students and your instructor. Due to the nature of the online environment, there are some things to remember.

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All students pay tuition and deserve a positive and courteous learning environment. Students should be aware that their behavior impacts other people, even when interacting online. I hope that we will all strive to develop a positive and supportive environment and will be courteous to fellow students and your instructor. Due to the nature of the online environment, there are some things to remember.
  1. Think before you write and reread your writing before you post anything online. Without the use of nonverbals with your message, your message can be misinterpreted. Sarcasm and humor can be difficult to interpret online and should be avoided.
  2. Keep it relevant. There are places to chat and post for fun everyday stuff. Inside a discussion board, stay on topic. Have your responses answer the question provided, expand the discussion to other relevant areas or build on the work from your classmates.
  3. Never use all caps. This is the equivalent of yelling in the online world. It is also hard to read. Only use capital letters when appropriate.
  4. Make sure that you are using appropriate grammar and structure. Some people in the class that may not understand things like "CU L8R," not to mention it does nothing to help expand your writing and vocabulary skills. Emoticons are fine as long as they are appropriate. A smile smily is welcome; anything offensive is not.
  5. Treat people the same as you would face-to-face. In other words it is easy to hide behind the computer. In some cases it empowers people to treat others in ways they would not in person. Remember there is a person behind the name on your screen. Treat all with dignity and respect and you can expect that in return.
  6. Respect the time of others. This class is going to require you to work in groups. Learn to respect the time of others in your group and your experience will be much better. Always remember that you are not the only person with a busy schedule, be flexible. Do not procrastinate! You may be one that works best with the pressures of the deadline looming on you, but others may not be that way. The key to a successful group is organization, communication and a willingness to do what it takes to get it done.
  7. In discussion boards, do not respond with sentences like "I agree" or "Me too". These add nothing to the discussion.

Adapted from Six Practical Strategies to Improve Your Online Course, an online seminar by Magna Publications.